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The Morals of the Story

Foreword by Ravi Zacharias

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New in Theology


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The Abductive Moral Argument

a discussion with Matt Dillahunty and David Baggett 

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C.S. Lewis Onstage 

The Most Reluctant Covert

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Good God Panel Discussion

 

with David Baggett, Paul Copan, William Lane Craig, and Jerry Walls



When Christianity says that God loves man, it means that God loves man: not that He has some ‘disinterested’, because really indifferent, concern for our welfare, but that, in awful and surprising truth, we are the objects of His love. You asked for a loving God: you have one. The great spirit you so lightly invoked, the ‘lord of terrible aspect’, is present: not a senile benevolence that drowsily wishes you to be happy in your own way, not the cold philanthropy of a conscientious magistrate, not the care of a host who feels responsible for the comfort of his guests, but the consuming fire Himself, the Love that made the worlds, persistent as the artist’s love for his work and despotic as a man’s love for a dog, provident and venerable as a father’s love for a child, jealous, inexorable, exacting as love between the sexes.
— C. S. Lewis